Through Voices, the Iowa State Daily seeks to facilitate civil discourse and build awareness about diversity on the Iowa State University campus.

This website is a place to share, listen, educate, learn and inspire. It is a place to tell stories of what makes us different, yet similar, in our experiences, in our values and in our beliefs. We hope to set the precedent for future students and ISU community members, that this campus is a place to challenge your thoughts while respecting others’ beliefs and backgrounds.

We want to make the Iowa State campus a welcome environment for sharing ideas and opinions

We need your help. Find out how you can best contribute to the conversation by discovering what kind of communicator you are. Try this quiz to help determine your personality type...

Someone just invited you to an event at their place Friday night. Are you...

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Discourse In Action

Medical Apartheid: The History of Experimentation on Black Americans - September 18, 2017

Medical Apartheid: The History of Experimentation on Black Americans

Great Hall, MU - 7 p.m.

Harriet Washington delves into her book of the same title discussing the history of these actions. Washington is a fellow in ethics at the Harvard Medical School, fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health, in addition to many other titles.

Portrait of America: How Demographic Change and Economic Inequality Are Reshaping Society - October 4, 2017

Portrait of America: How Demographic Change and Economic Inequality Are Reshaping Society

Sun Room, MU - 7 p.m.

John Iceland is Professor of Sociology and Demography at Penn State University. His research and teaching interests lie in demography, social inequality, and immigration. He is currently co-editor of the journal Demography and vice president-elect of the Population Association of America.

Back to the Future: The Social Justice Origins and Future of Latinx Studies - October 5, 2017

Back to the Future: The Social Justice Origins and Future of Latinx Studies

Campanile Room, MU - 8 p.m.

Ginetta Candelario is an associate professor of sociology and Latin American & Latino/a Studies at Smith College, where her teaching focuses on race and ethnicity in the Americas, Latina/o communities in the United States and Latin American, and Latina feminist activism.

Racial Equality and Catholic Teaching - October 6, 2017

Sun Room, MU - 7 p.m.

Dr. Martin Luther King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech in our nation’s capital nearly 55 years ago, on August 28, 1963. Anne Clifford, the Msgr. James A. Supple Chair in Catholic Studies at Iowa State University, will speak about Dr. King's life and work advocating for racial justice in light of recent developments in America and Catholic teachings on racism, especially those of United States Bishops.

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